M+ Stories HomepageM+ Stories Homepage
A woman dressed in a black long-sleeved shirt and black pants stands in the middle of the M+ shop in the M+ Pavilion, consisting of products set up on shelves, tables, and clothes mannequins.

Meet the Team: Inside the M+ Shop

Share via Facebook
Share via Twitter
Share via WeChat

Amanda Yip, Senior Manager, Museum Retail Merchandising, answers five questions about her job at M+!

1. What brought you to M+?

I had been working in product development and merchandising in the retail business for almost twenty years and was starting to think about what was next in my career and in my life. That’s why, when I saw that M+ was looking for someone to do product development, I applied. I had heard about the M+ project for so many years, and was very curious about it. Although I was never particularly interested in art, once I started, I realised that it was something that I wanted to explore more. During my twenty years in the commercial world, I would sometimes work with artists, but never on this level.

It’s very different, and very challenging, especially for someone with my background. I came from the commercial world and studied mechanical engineering, so I'm used to applying my logical and commercial skills to solve problems—but when it comes to art, you can’t always use logic to explain it. It’s quite an interesting experience for me.

2. Describe a typical day for you.

Oil painting on canvas depicting two ping pong paddles, one red and one blue, and a white ping pong ball lying spread out on a bright green surface. The blue paddle is only barely visible in the bottom left corner of the painting, while the red paddle and white ball lie close together near the top right corner.

How Artists Use Colour to Communicate

Share via Facebook
Share via Twitter
Share via WeChat

The new M+ Collections Beta website lets you explore over 5,000 objects and archival items from the M+ Collections online. As a ‘beta website’, it will grow and evolve over the coming years, as we explore new ways to let you discover and roam through the collections. One of the ways you can already do that on the website is through colour, using the new colour picker feature.

Apart from being a fun way to discover new works, this feature can also help illuminate some of the ways that colour theory can influence our understandings of artworks and objects. Below, we give a quick introduction to colour theory 101, and how artists and makers can use colour in their work, using some examples from the M+ Collections that you can find on the beta website.

The Colour Wheel

Five slivers of the works and objects in the post below have been put together to form a banner. From left to right are details of a red taxi sculpture, a wooden stool, a video still depicting a woman kissing her reflection on a mirror covered in a layer of water, an acrylic painting on canvas of geometric forms presenting an abstracted view of an architectural proposal, and an ink and colour painting on paper of a circular vortex-like element almost entirely enveloped by a swathe of red ink loosely resembling a diamond.

5 Women Artists You Should Know

Share via Facebook
Share via Twitter
Share via WeChat

Happy International Women's Day! Can you name five women artists?

For the past few years, M+ has been proud to participate in #5WomenArtists, a global social media campaign organised by the National Museum of Women in the Arts to address gender inequality in the arts. Throughout March, we highlight five works in the M+ Collections by women artists, designers, architects, or filmmakers on the @mplusmuseum Instagram account.

For International Women’s Day this year, we looked back through the artists and practitioners we’ve previously highlighted during #5WomenArtists and picked five that we think you should know about:

1. Amy Cheung (Hong Kong)

A playground with multiple sculptural climbing structures. Two of the structures consist of coloured concrete cylinders and half-cylinders stacked on top of each other in different combinations. The third consists of a large, flat, white piece of concrete with large holes cut in it, curved, angled, and shaped so that it curves over the ground, angles outwards, and then curves into itself from underneath. Numerous children sit or stand on top of these structures and mill about below them.

A Brief History of Playgrounds in Hong Kong

Share via Facebook
Share via Twitter
Share via WeChat

The below article was written by Fan Lok Yi, curator and artist based in Hong Kong, who, in a team with curator, artist, and academic Sampson Wong, is a recipient of the 2018 M+ / Design Trust Research Fellowship. They have been studying the international trends and local factors that shaped 20th-century Hong Kong playscapes.

In the early twentieth century, Hong Kong was plagued by a problem with street children caused by widespread poverty and a lack of social welfare support. To address this issue, in 1929, the government started to construct the first urban playgrounds for children to spend time in and let off steam.