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A man stands at the front of a cinema underneath a screen with a turntable in front of him. The screen is showing a moving image work, depicting a surreally stretched-out Hong Kong street. Numerous people sit on the cinema chairs in front of the man and the screen.

Experimenting with Live Cinema through the M+ Collections

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What is live cinema? Unlike a traditional film screening, live cinema is a performance in which artists experiment and improvise with the moving images on display. M+ recently held the museum’s first ever live cinema event, Haunting Images: Live Cinema by Lim Giong, inviting Taiwanese composer and musician Lim Giong to create live sonic and musical scoring to the images on screen. Lim started working in the late '80s and early '90s as a boundary-pushing electronic musician, and over the decades, he has developed his practice to include film scoring, thinking about moving images in a very particular way.

For Haunting Images, he put together a programme of moving image works including three works selected from the M+ Collections. Below, we show how Lim scored these works, and why.

1. Static No. 23 (Revolve) (2017) by Daniel Crooks

Two images displayed side by side. The image on the left shows a sculpture made of sheets of galvanized steel. Three vertical sheets that are curved at the top are stacked in order of increasing height, connected by another sheet going through them. The image on the right shows a wooden box with the words ‘Carnation Milk’ printed on the side. The inside of the box is filled with a piece of a white marble sculpture.

First Look at 'Noguchi for Danh Vo: Counterpoint'

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Noguchi for Danh Vo: Counterpoint is the newest exhibition in the M+ Pavilion, running from 16 November 2018 to 22 April 2019. Here’s a round-up of what you need to know:

What is this exhibition about?

This exhibition is a dialogue between two artists, both considered to be some of the most influential figures in modern and contemporary art history: Japanese-American artist Isamu Noguchi (1904–1988) and Vietnamese-Danish artist Danh Vo (born 1975).

The two artists never met and belong to different generations, geographies, and social settings; however, Vo has deeply explored and researched Noguchi’s life and art over the past few years. This exhibition doesn’t just let visitors see this exploration and dialogue in person, but also highlights the two artists’ independent bodies of work.

A smiling woman with short dark hair stands in an office space next to a desk. Behind her are shelves on top of which two signs are perched, with one reading ‘The power of +’ and the other one reading ‘Hong Kong + Asia + the World’.

Meet the Team: An Artist in Arts Administration

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Loretta Chau, Manager of Administration, answers five questions about her job at M+!

1. What brought you to M+?

I’d say I brought myself to M+.

When I learned about the West Kowloon Cultural District and M+ museum projects from the news in around 2004–2006, I was so excited that Hong Kong, being one of the metropolitan cities in Asia, would finally have its own piece of art wonderland. At that point, I started to think about my career and the possibility of involvement in such a museum project. I love travelling and every time I visited a museum overseas, I would think about what working life would be like in a cultural environment with a great artistic atmosphere. How I would feel different in the role of museum staff compared to museum visitor. Over the years I paid great attention to M+’s job openings, and I finally got the chance in 2014 to become part of the M+ family.

2. Describe a typical day for you.

Three colour prints side by side. The image on the far left depicts an English Springer Spaniel dog viewed in profile, staring upwards, in front of an old-fashioned harbour with wooden boats and mountains in the distance. The middle image depicts a large pink tropical flower displayed over a background of Hong Kong’s Victoria Harbour under a blue sky. The image on the far right depicts a woman wearing a tiara, pearl necklace, a white dress, and a blue sash with royal medals on it. Behind her is a historical Chinese painting of horse riders in a grassy field. The woman has a tattoo of one of the horse riders on her shoulder. Fine cracks appear across all three works, imitating the surface of an old oil painting.

The Hollian Thesaurus: A Piece of Hong Kong Photography History

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In her Hollian Thesaurus series, photographer Holly Lee muses on the past and future of Hong Kong around the time of the transfer of sovereignty in 1997. The series consists of twelve conceptual photographs created between 1994 and 2000, touching on this period of intense change.

Thanks to digital technology, the ’90s was a period when conceptual photography flourished in Hong Kong, and Lee was among the pioneers who expanded the language of photography during this time. She experimented with Photoshop to create the Hollian Thesaurus in a type of photography known as composite photography. To create the series, Lee combined straight photography, photographic-sourced imagery, digital manipulation, and 19th century export painting from Guangdong.