Four people play badminton without a net in a circular courtyard surrounded on all sides by residential towers.

How Street Badminton Can Help Us Rethink Hong Kong’s Public Spaces

In 2019, artist Shirley Tse represented Hong Kong at the 58th Venice Biennale with her exhibition Shirley Tse: Stakeholders, Hong Kong in Venice. A version of this show is currently on display in Hong Kong at the M+ Pavilion until 1 November 2020 as Shirley Tse: Stakes and Holders.

One of the exhibition’s installations, Playcourt, consists of multiple sculptures that form a surreal, makeshift game of badminton. The work is based on Tse’s memories of playing street badminton in Hong Kong as a child. We invited artist and urban researcher Sampson Wong to join her in a conversation about badminton and public spaces. The resulting discussion, which you can read below, ranged from exploring the colonial imagery of Tse’s badminton sculptures to how Hong Kong spaces can unofficially transform from private to public.

Artist Shirley Tse discusses her work with various tools throughout the two decades of her sculptural practice.

Artist and curator in dialogue: Shirley Tse’s Sculptural Processes, Tools, and Objects

📹📃Video transcript for ‘Artist and curator in dialogue: Shirley Tse’s Sculptural Processes, Tools, and Objects’

In Shirley Tse: Stakes and Holders, Tse explores ancient and recent technologies in craft, manufacturing, and communications to create works that shed light on contemporary society.

In this conversation with guest curator Christina Li, Tse discusses her work with various tools throughout the two decades of her sculptural practice. The artist unpacks her thinking and processes, placing particular emphasis on the ways in which technologies and the objects we use shape our realities.

Oval-shaped bamboo building surrounded by two other buildings on either side. It consists of two storeys with thatched roofs and a porch that goes around the bottom floor.

Rethinking ‘Tradition’ Through Contemporary Architecture in Indonesia

Reinterpreting ‘tradition’ and integrating it into contemporary practices is an enduring issue for many architects. This is especially true across Asia, where distinct forms of traditional buildings exist. In 2019, Yasmin Tri Aryani was awarded the M+ / Design Trust Research Fellowship for her proposed research into the ever-changing conception and application of what is considered ‘traditional architecture’ in Indonesia.

Below, we talk with Tri Aryani about her findings—from how ‘traditional architecture’ has been instrumentalised since the Dutch colonial era to how certain architects in Indonesia have exercised a more expanded notion of ‘tradition’ in the past decade.

What led to your interest in how ‘traditional’ elements have figured in contemporary architectural production in Indonesia?

Artist Heman Chong, and curator, Pauline Yao, discuss an object that has particular resonance for them right now during the COVID-19 pandemic.

In Conversation: Heman Chong

The In Conversation series pairs M+ curators with contemporary artists, designers, and makers to chat about their current practice and works in the M+ Collections. Explore how artists and makers are consuming the visual world as they share an image or object that has particular resonance for them right now.

In this inaugural session, Heman Chong—an artist, curator and writer based in Singapore—is in conversation with Pauline J. Yao, Lead Curator, Visual Art, M+.

Learn more about Heman Chong’s works and writing:

A video transcript of this video will be made available shortly.

Warning: This video contains some swearing.


Artwork credits:

Heman Chong, Monument to the people we've conveniently forgotten (I hate you), 2008, printed business cards. M+, Hong Kong. © Copyright the artist. Courtesy the Wilkinson Gallery, London
Heman Chong, Calendars 2020-2096, 2004–2010, offset prints on paper. M+, Hong Kong. © Copyright the artist. Courtesy the Wilkinson Gallery, London
Heman Chong, Safe Entry, 2020. Digital Print. Commissioned by Singapore Art Museum. © Heman Chong
Heman Chong, Foreign Affairs, 2018. UV print on unprimed canvas. © Heman Chong & Amanda Wilkinson Gallery