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Hong Kong artist Wong Tin Yan presents his very own quiz show, ‘Yes but Why?’.

Wong Tin Yan: ‘Yes but Why?’ Quiz Show

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Playing the role of the storyteller, artist Wong Tin Yan shares a story about learning. What is right, and what is wrong? Can we always find the answers in textbooks? Wong Tin Yan invites us to join him on a search for fresh and original perspectives.

The Yes but Why? quiz show is part of the M+ Rover programme.

Photograph of two men handling a sculpture in a gallery space. The visible part of the sculpture has a weathered, patina finish and features a man's head attached to a body with angel wings; in the place of arms is a circular device with 10 holes. One man is handling the sculpture's wings with gloved hands; the other is screwing something into the platform.

From Forklifts to Finishing Touches: Inside the Work of an Art Technician

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When it comes to museum work, most people know that curators build the collection, and conservators preserve and protect the artworks. But do you know how an artwork gets from storage into the gallery?

Art technicians play a crucial role in giving the public first-hand access to our collections, but their work is much more than simply moving and placing an object. On any given day, an art technician may be installing a sculpture, configuring complex audio-visual systems, or brainstorming the best way to transport a pillar of human fat. It’s a job that requires not only immense technical knowledge, but also creativity, collaboration, and excellent spatial awareness.

Kieran Champion, Senior Manager of Installation and Displays at M+, shares his journey into the field, the ins and outs of installing priceless objects and artworks, and the joys of building a team in Hong Kong.

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A conversation between artist Henry Chu and producer Kate Gu.

In Conversation: Henry Chu

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In this conversation, Hong Kong web designer, programmer, and media artist Henry Chu chats to Kate Gu, Producer of Digital Special Projects at M+ about the museum’s latest digital commission, Canto Cocktail.

The In Conversation series pairs M+ staff with contemporary artists, designers, and makers to chat about their current practice and works in the M+ Collections. Explore how artists and makers are consuming the visual world as they share an image or object that resonates with them right now.

A transcript of this video will be made available shortly.


Artwork credits: Henry Chu. ‘Canto Cocktail’, 2020. Commissioned by M+. © Henry Chu

Photograph of a long, grey rectangular building. The concrete walls are tilted inward, and each of the two visible storeys are lined with yellow-framed windows. In the foreground is a tiled walk way, steps, a raid railing and a yellow lamp post. Two schoolgirls in blue sleeveless dress uniforms stand by the lamp post chatting; one has her arm draped over the red railing. Two other girls sit further back on the ground by the building; a boy is approaching the foreground.

In Search of Hong Kong Brutalism

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Brutalism is an architectural style that emerged in 1950s United Kingdom, characterised by exposed raw concrete and bold geometry. In the 1960s and 1970s, Brutalism spread globally—including to Hong Kong.

Many Brutalist buildings are now in danger of disappearing through demolition or remodelling. As a response, curator and architecture critic Oliver Elser developed the SOS Brutalism project, a database and campaign aimed at raising awareness of ‘our beloved concrete monsters’. As a recipient of the M+ / Design Trust Fellowship 2019, Elser investigated the degree to which Brutalism and its transformations have manifested in Hong Kong. Below, we ask him to share some highlights from his research.

What led to the urgency, and value, of re-examining Brutalist architecture?