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Five slivers of the works and objects in the post below have been put together to form a banner. From left to right are details of a red taxi sculpture, a wooden stool, a video still depicting a woman kissing her reflection on a mirror covered in a layer of water, an acrylic painting on canvas of geometric forms presenting an abstracted view of an architectural proposal, and an ink and colour painting on paper of a circular vortex-like element almost entirely enveloped by a swathe of red ink loosely resembling a diamond.

5 Women Artists You Should Know

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Happy International Women's Day! Can you name five women artists?

For the past few years, M+ has been proud to participate in #5WomenArtists, a global social media campaign organised by the National Museum of Women in the Arts to address gender inequality in the arts. Throughout March, we highlight five works in the M+ Collections by women artists, designers, architects, or filmmakers on the @mplusmuseum Instagram account.

For International Women’s Day this year, we looked back through the artists and practitioners we’ve previously highlighted during #5WomenArtists and picked five that we think you should know about:

1. Amy Cheung (Hong Kong)

A small rectangular cardboard box sits upright against a blank background. A flab on the top says ‘Tamagotchi’, and a flap on the front has been opened to reveal a small round opening covered by plastic containing a round, red Tamagotchi device. A small screen on the front of the device shows a small bird-like pet. On the cardboard surrounding the device is a photograph of a bridge at night time surrounded by fireworks, and an array of small cartoon creatures dancing and smiling along the bottom.

From the Collections: Tamagotchi (1997 Hong Kong Collector’s Edition)

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This portable Tamagotchi game (1997 Hong Kong Collector’s Edition) from Bandai Co. is in the M+ Collections, but what is it, who made it, and why did M+ acquire it? William Seung, Curatorial Assistant, Design & Architecture, M+, explains:

What is this?

This is an early generation of a Tamagotchi, a portable pet-raising simulation game. The name is a combination of the Japanese words tamago (‘egg’) and wocchi (‘watch’)—referring to both the gameplay (raising a pet from an egg and keeping watch over it) and its egg-like case and keychain that lets you walk around with it. The goal of the game is to take care of a Tamagotchi, a mysterious alien-like creature, so that it can grow up from a toddler to an adult. Players have to keep it in a good mood, teach it to be well-behaved, and feed it when it’s hungry.

Nine rows of sixteen emojis depicting different images and with different monochromatic colours. Each emoji fits into just twelve by twelve pixels.

Which Old-School Emoji Are You?

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Did you know that emojis are twenty years old? And that the original design sketches of the first ever emojis are in the M+ Collections? Fitting within a tiny 12x12 pixel frame, they were developed in 1999 by Japanese telecommunication company NTT DOCOMO INC alongside its launch of i-mode, the world’s first mobile telephone internet service.

The graphic designs of the first 176 emojis were created by Kurita Shigetaka and architect Aoki Jun, with a second batch of seventy-six released in 2002. Kurita came up with the visual system of emojis to help convey information on the small phone screens.

So, this leads to one important question: which of these original emojis best fits your personality? Take the quiz below to find out.

All emoji images ©NTT DOCOMO, INC.

Oil painting on canvas of a panda sitting on an elegant lawn chair in the middle of a large green meadow. The panda is sitting in front of a small lawn table with a bottle and two plates of food on it.

From the Collections: ‘Untitled’ by Wang Xingwei

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Untitled (2003) by Wang Xingwei is in the M+ Collections, but what is it, who made it, and why did M+ acquire it? Isabella Tam, Associate Curator, Visual Art, M+, explains:

What is this?

Untitled is a painting by Chinese artist Wang Xingwei. It depicts a panda sitting on a lavish chair in a green meadow, having a leisurely moment with wine and other delicacies. While the gradation of green and white in the background evokes a sense of afternoon light, there are no other visible clues to further contextualise the scene.