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3D-printed sculpture in a glass case that looks like an old bronze sculpture of Pythagoras.

What You Need to Know About 'Samson Young: Songs for Disaster Relief World Tour'

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What is it?

Samson Young: Songs for Disaster Relief World Tour is an exhibition of spatial sound installation works by multidisciplinary artist Samson Young. The ‘songs for disaster relief’ in the title refers to charity singles—purpose-made recordings for raising funds and awareness for charitable causes. Think of iconic examples like We Are The World and Do They Know It’s Christmas?. Samson Young draws on this music genre and reframes it, exploring the ideologies behind it.

From Ying Kwok, Guest Curator: ‘The exhibition is like a musical album unfolding in a physical space. You have to walk inside and through to experience it—not just by looking at the art, but also really listening to the sounds.’

In 2017, Young represented Hong Kong with the premiere of the exhibition at the 57th Venice Biennale under the title Samson Young: Songs for Disaster Relief.

Installation in which a television screen plays a video of an animated model of a girl in a sprawled pose against a bright pink background. The television stands in front of a brick wall with a curtain with the words ‘Let them know it’s Christmas time’ across it. Small sculptural busts stand on top of the television.

Palazzo Gundane (homage to the myth-maker who fell to earth) 2017. Silk-screen print on vinyl cover, felt-tip pen on vinyl records, 3D-printed nylon, vitrine of found objects, movable curtain system, neon, video, animation, and ten-channel sound installation. Photo: Simon Vogel

How can I see the exhibition?

You can see this exhibition at the M+ Pavilion, which is open Wednesday to Sunday, 11am—6pm. It will run from 9 February to 6 May 2018. Learn more about the exhibition and associated programmes, including musical performances, guided tours, and talks, here.

Who is the artist?

Samson Young, a multidisciplinary artist from Hong Kong. He’s a classically trained musician and composer. His interest in historical and socio-political subject matters, and his skill in breaking these down into components of music, have allowed him to reveal the political nature of sound and to connect it with history, place, and time in his own unique way.

Will the M+ Pavilion exhibition look different from the Venice Biennale version?

This is a very site-specific exhibition, so yes, it will! The concept is the same, but when the works were moved to Hong Kong, the character of each work was enhanced and consolidated with some of Samson’s previous practice. The work Lullaby, for example, will be quite different in the M+ Pavilion. In Venice, it was shown in a hidden space by a quiet canal, echoing the waterside filming location and emotions in the video. In the M+ Pavilion, a simulated recording room was built to showcase it in a different way, reflecting the intimacy of the listening experience.

Installation consisting of sofas, lamps, tables, a rug, two television screens, a rocking horse, and a coat rack with a coat in a dark room lit with warm tones.

Palazzo Gundane (homage to the myth-maker who fell to earth) 2017. Silk-screen print on vinyl cover, felt-tip pen on vinyl records, 3D-printed nylon, vitrine of found objects, movable curtain system, neon, video, animation, and ten-channel sound installation. Photo: Simon Vogel

Anything particular that is different about this exhibition than previous M+ exhibitions?

For the first time, there will be a pop-up store to go along with an exhibition. Called ‘M+ Essential Editions’, and designed to look like the dressing room of Boomtown Gundane, the exhibition’s fictional character, the store will feature products developed in collaboration between Young and M+ curators. You’ll find it on the ground floor of the M+ Pavilion.

Where can I go if I want to know more?

If you want to know more about this exhibition, you can contact us here with any questions. If you’re in the M+ Pavilion, you can ask any of the exhibition helpers or people in the reception if you’re wondering anything. We look forward to hearing from you!

A moving gif shows a toy horse next to a table with a lamp that keeps changing colour from red, to blue, to pink.

Palazzo Gundane (homage to the myth-maker who fell to earth), 2017. Silk-screen print on vinyl cover, felt-tip pen on vinyl records, 3D-printed nylon, vitrine of found objects, movable curtain system, neon, video, animation, and ten-channel sound installation. Photo: Simon Vogel


Image at top of post: Palazzo Gundane (homage to the myth-maker who fell to earth) 2017. Silk-screen print on vinyl cover, felt-tip pen on vinyl records, 3D-printed nylon, vitrine of found objects, movable curtain system, neon, video, animation, and ten-channel sound installation. Photo: Simon Vogel

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